Shampoo Recipes


Homemade Shampoo Recipes

Making your own completely natural shampoo couldn't be easier or more fun.  There are many benefits to making shampoo yourself,  it costs less, you can customize each shampoo to your specific hair needs, and most importantly, you will have a product that does not contain the laundry list of toxins that store bought brands include.  Making shampoo that is chemical and toxin free is not only beneficial for us, but for the planet as well.   


As is the case with store bought products, there will be some trial and error before you find the exact combination of ingredients that suits your individual needs.  In addition to the experimentation process, some people find that their hair takes awhile to adjust to the new, chemical free shampoo, mostly due to the fact that your hair is actually purging all the nasty build up that has been accumulating there for the last couple decades.  I am a big fan of using baking soda to clarify the hair and start the process of ridding your hair of the years of chemical build up.  And for eliminating residue and restoring hair to its natural ph, nothing can beat an apple cider vinegar rinse.  I noticed a difference right away when I made the switch to my homemade shampoo, but it can take some people more time.  So be patient, try different herbs and enjoy the rewards of going chemical free! 

Basics of homemade shampoo:

The Base
Castile Soap-  is soap made from a group of vegetable oils, usually olive, hemp, coconut, and jojoba.  It is available in liquid or flake form.  The purest castile soaps are made from olive oil only.  Pure olive oil Castile is the best soap to use if you can get it.  Castile soap differs greatly from other soaps, which are made from animal fat.  One of the many benefits of Castile soap is it's ingredients are non-toxic and biodegradable, which means less environmental impact.  This soap has many uses such as, general household cleansing, hair and body cleansing, shaving foam, pet shampoo, and it is wonderful to use on baby's delicate skin.  I use unscented Castile if I am adding other scents to my shampoo but lately I've been experimenting with other varieties.  Almond and Peppermint are my two new favorites!  Dr. Bronner's Castile soap is available at many grocery and health stores and is a wonderful brand to use.

The Water
Distilled Water-  Why distilled water?  Tap water and purified water contain minerals and impurities.   They leave mineral deposits in your hair that build up over time and make your hair dull. Distilled water is water that has had the impurities and minerals removed through distillation. Distilled water is widely used in automotive coolant systems, cigar humidors, and irons for the same reason- less mineral deposits.  It is not recommended to drink distilled water, but for use in homemade shampoo- there is no substitute. 

The Additions
Herbs and oils- There are many different herbs and essential oils to choose from.  You will need to soak the nutrients out of the herbs and into the distilled water before adding them into your shampoo.  It's basically like making tea- you will steep the herbs in water, and then strain them to remove the leaves.   Whether you use dried herbs or essential oils depends largely on the herb you are using.  Dried herbs tend to be cheaper than oils but you will not find all herbs in their dry form.  I always use rosemary in its dried form, but Clary sage in oil form.   

The best herbs for essentially every hair type are:

Rosemary-  is most known for it's stimulating and invigorating properties.  It stimulates the hair follicles, which helps hair grow.  It is also known for it's ability to slow down hair loss and the onset of gray hair.  It has even been shown to darken existing gray hair.  It is beneficial for flaky, dry scalp making it a great addition for people suffering from dandruff.

Sage- has many of the same benefits that rosemary does.  It boosts hair growth, and aids in fighting hair loss. It is helpful for regrowing hair and fighting premature balding.   It strengthens hair making it more manageable and restoring shine.

Tea Tree Oil-  is known for it's antiseptic and antibacterial abilities.  It is great for moisturizing the hair, and for people with dandruff, since it kills the fungus that causes it.  It unclogs the hair follicles of dirt and residue leaving the hair thoroughly clean.  It may help hair grow as well, seeing as blocked hair follicles can impede hair growth. 

Ginger- is widely known for it's powerful stimulating properties.  It helps to increase blood flow to the scalp, which can help to grow hair.  It has been used not only to treat hair loss, but has been shown to improve brittle and dry hair as well.

Lemongrass- is known for its gentle cleansing properties.  It thoroughly cleans the hair without stripping it and leaving it dry.  It add fullness, body and improves the luster of the hair.

Other herbs that can be used in shampoo are:

Peppermint-  is known for its PH balancing properties, which makes it ideal for both neutralizing oily hair and moisturizing dry hair.  It also stimulates the scalp, aiding in hair growth.  And for adding a clean, fresh scent to your shampoo, there is nothing quite like this herb!

Chamomile-  known as the calming herb, chamomile can soothe a dry, irritated scalp.  It is known for its hair lightening ability, so while it is wonderful for blonds, I strongly discourage people with darker hair colors from using it.

Nettles-  have been used since ancient times as a hair tonic.  They stimulate hair growth and restore luster and shine.  Nettle, means "to burn" and it is this sensation that increases blood flow and brings oxygen to the scalp and follicles.  Nettle has been known to alter women's menstrual period so it is not advised for women who are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are nursing.

Essential Oils
Essential oils are concentrated liquids containing aroma compounds from plants.  They have been used for centuries for medicinal and cosmetic purposes.  Essential oils can be used in place of herbs or to add fragrance to your shampoo.  Almond, vanilla, and lemon oils can be used as long as they are not the type intended for baking.

Other Note-worthy Shampoo Tips




Do not expect homemade shampoo to lather like commercial brands.  Almost all commercial products contain lathering agents,  surfactants, like sodium laryl sulfate.  We have become accustomed to think that suds= clean, but that simply is not true.  While your homemade shampoo may not make a head full of bubbles, it will clean, moisturize and protect better than its bubbly counterpart.

Another thing to consider with homemade shampoo is- it is a natural product and therefore does not have an indefinite shelf life.  Just like food without preservatives, the shelf life is shorter than a chemical laden product.  Homemade shampoo can last for almost a year if stored properly in an airtight container, preferably glass.  You can keep the majority of your shampoo in a mason jar with a lid and then keep a small amount in an old shampoo bottle for use in the shower, since glass isn't recommended in a wet, slippery place!  Store shampoo in a dry, cool place away from direct sunlight.  If these conditions can't be met, discard after 6 months.

Homemade shampoo  does not contain thickening agents.  It will be an extremely thin, watery liquid.  I personally do not mind this, you just have to learn to pour very slowly.  I have found that putting some in a plastic squeeze bottle, helps in not wasting your shampoo.  Otherwise, you will end up pouring out way more than you need.  I have very long, thick hair and I use a very small amount of shampoo.  If the consistency is just too watery for your taste, I have heard of people adding xantham gum to their shampoo to thicken it up, but I have not tried this yet and can't attest to its effectiveness.

Certain precautions must be taken when using homemade shampoos.  Because many of them contain herbs and essential oils, there is a chance of an allergy or adverse affect.  Do not use if you have any abnormal reaction to any of the herbs.  Always consult a medical professional before using if you are or plan to become pregnant, are nursing, or have any other medical conditions.

One last consideration.  All shampoos are somewhat alkaline.  Dr. Bronner's Castile soap is very alkaline, somewhere between 9. and 10. Ph.  Hair itself has a slightly acidic Ph level, and it is this acid that provides hair with its protective barrier.  To restore hair to it's naturally acidic state, it is recommended to use a vinegar rinse after washing your hair with any shampoo, but especially homemade ones.  You can read more about vinegar rinses below.

Basic Shampoo
- for normal hair
-the base mixture for most other shampoo recipes

1 c  distilled water
1/4 c  liquid Castile Soap - unscented or any other variety
1/2 t  jojoba, grapeseed, or avocado oil

Mix together all the ingredients. Store in a bottle. Shake before use.


Basic Herbal Shampoo
-for all hair types

1 c distilled water
1/4 c Castile soap- any scent
3 T dried rosemary
1 T lemongrass
2 T tea tree oil
1/2 t grapeseed, jojoba, or avocado oil

Boil water.  Add rosemary and lemongrass, either in a tea ball or strainer or just place in boiling water. Mix herbs around a bit and then cover and steep for 30-40 minutes, or until fragrant.  Strain liquid into mason jar, or other glass container, removing any pieces of herbs.  Add tea tree oil, grapeseed oil and Castile soap.  Mix thoroughly- you are combining water, oil, and soap so it needs to be mixed very well.  Allow to cool completely and place tight fitting lid on container.  Store properly.


Easy, Economical Shampoo
-for all hair types

1 c distilled water
4 T dried rosemary
1 t lemongrass oil
1/4 c Castile soap- any scent

Bring water to a boil.  Add rosemary and mix herbs around a bit.  Steep for 30-40 mintues or until fragrant.  Strain into a glass container and add soap and lemongrass.  Mix until thoroughly blended.  Store properly.

Hydrate
-for dry hair

1 c distilled water
1/4 c liquid Castile Soap - any scent
1/4 c aloe vera gel
1/2 t glycerin
1/4 t jojoba, avocado, or grapeseed oil

Mix together all the ingredients. Store properly in a bottle with a tight fitting lid and always shake well before using.


Basic Sage Shampoo
- for all hair types

1 c distilled water
1/4 c Castile soap- any scent
2 T clary sage essential oil
1/4 t jojoba or avocado oil

Combine all ingredients and blend well.  Store properly.


Lighten up
-for lightening and refreshing blond hair

1 c distilled water
1/4 c Castile  soap - any scent
6 chamomile tea bags
1 t glycerin

Steep the teabags in 1 c of boiled water for 20 minutes. Remove the tea bags and add Castile soap. Stir in glycerin and mix thoroughly.  Keep in a dark, cool place in a sealed bottle.

Sweet Shampoo

1 c distilled water
1/4 c liquid Castile Soap - use unscented  or almond
1/4 t  jojoba oil or avocado oil
8 drops vanilla fragrance oil
8 drops coconut fragrance oil

Combine all ingredients and mix thoroughly.  Place in bottle and store properly.  This one smells divine!


Apple Cider Vinegar Rinse
-adds shine, vibrancy and removes build up
-not recommended for daily use- try once a week

1/3 c apple cider vinegar- only use the raw, unfiltered type.  I love Bragg's!
1 c distilled water

Put mixture in a plastic squeeze bottle and shake well.    Shampoo hair and rinse well.   Apply vinegar rinse and let sit for a couple minutes.  Rinse with cold water to seal the hair shaft.  Most people say they do not need conditioner after using this.  Your hair will smell of vinegar slightly but the smell will dissipate after awhile.

Vinegar rinses are wonderful to restore the hair's natural Ph level.  Apple cider vinegar and hair share a similar Ph level.  It helps to rid any residue and sticky build up that causes hair to look dull.  It will add shine and life to your hair!  Some people find it helps to rinse with vinegar when first switching to homemade shampoo.

Ultimate Cleanse
- use to remove build up and rejuvenate hair

1 t Baking soda
1/8 c Apple cider vinegar
1/2 c  Water

Put 1 ts baking soda in a cup or mug to take into the shower with you.
In another cup, pour in  vinegar.
When you get into the shower, fill the baking soda cup with about 1/4 c water.  Apply this to your roots only, massage.   Scrub mixture into your scalp and rinse.

Finish by adding about 1/4 c water to the vinegar.  Pour mixture over hair and let sit for a couple minutes.  Rinse!

                                                     Hot Oil Treatment
- use this every two weeks to replenish dry hair and restore shine

1/2 c dried rosemary
1/2 c olive oil

Combine herbs and oil in a saucepan over low heat, stirring frequently until warm. Remove from heat and strain.  Test temperature before pouring on hair.  You want a hot oil treatment- not a burned scalp! Pour mixture on hair, being sure to saturate the whole head, from scalp to ends.  Cover hair in saran wrap and then wrap head in a towel. Leave on 15 minutes. Wash twice to remove excess oil.


Luster Shampoo
-use this to add shine to all hair types

1 c distilled water
1/4 c Castile soap- any variety
2 T dried rosemary
2 T sweet almond oil
1/4 t lemon essential oil

Boil water and add rosemary- in a strainer if your have it.  Steep 30-40 minutes or until fragrant.  Strain leaves.   Add lemon, almond oil and soap and mix thoroughly.  Store properly. 










68 comments:

  1. made the basic shampoo because I was to lazy to do the others this seemed easier left a weird feeling in my hair but when I blow dried it I loved it! made a lot of it now should I store in the frig in glass container? and question on the grapeseed oil is that a 1/2 teaspoon or Tablespoon?

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    1. I put it in a foaming soap dispenser and it works great for hair and body for my entire family, including the smallest ones.

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  2. I am so glad you liked the shampoo. There is no need to store in fridge, it is best to leave it at room temperature in a cool, dry place. The measurement for the oil is 1/2 a teaspoon. I really like using avocado oil in mine!

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  3. so can you use the shampoo mixture for a body wash s well??

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  4. Is this okay to use everyday? My husband's hair is extremely oily and he shampoos his hair every other day. I would love to try this, thanks for sharing how to make it!

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    1. I don't recommend washing your hair more than a few times a week, if your husband is having a problem with excess oil, I would have him wash his hair with just baking soda and water and then rinse with apple cider vinegar.

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  5. Hi, thanks a lot for the article)) Do you still use these shampoos?and happy about it?
    Please advise what 'C' and 't' are? thanks a lot.Diana

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    1. Hi Diana,
      I still use homemade shampoo and absolutely love it! My hair has never been healthier! C refers to a cup, and t is a teaspoon! Hope this helps!

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    2. lower case t is teaspoon and upper case is T is Tablespoon :)

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  6. I have long (always had long) and thin fair hair. I have oily hair (had to wash next day or max on the 2d day), sometimes have a dandruf and also loosing hair and...
    So, after reaidng lots of info about all these oils, herbs..I want to make shampoo of water+castle soup + essential oils (rosemary, teatree, peppermint, netle, jojoba, grapesees and camomile).
    Whould be effective for my hair type?
    And do you just mix/blend well all ingredients? Should they be room temperature or warm?

    Thanks a lot! Diana.

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    1. Diana,
      You will find that homemade shampoo, with the addition of these healing herbs and the lack of chemicals will be extremely effective for your hair type. I wouldn't recommend using all the herbs and oils in the same shampoo, instead play around and make a few batches and see which works best for you. As for preparation, just mix and store at room temperature, being sure to shake before using. Also, hair benefits from less frequent washing, so even though you have oily hair, strive for only every 3 days washings and try using corn starch to absorb excess oil in between shampoos. Let me know how your experience goes!

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  7. I started using castile soap with fresh rosemary water. I also use it to wash my face since rosemary is great for acne as well and as a body wash. I was wondering, I know suds doesnt really mean cleaner but I am in the process of trying to switch. Do you recommend using vegetable type glycerine or do you think soap flakes will help?

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    1. Hi! I know that we are so accustomed to believing suds equal clean, but I don't recommend adding anything to increase the lather factor. If you need to have some lather to help you transition, I would use glycerin and then slowly decrease the amount as you get used to the "natural" feel of the shampooo.

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  8. Hi,

    I made the herbal shampoo (and added a few drops of peppermint oil to it as well) and the color turned out to be brown (i was expecting it to be the yellow and translucent like the color of the Castile soap ), is that ok?

    Also, I have stored it in a plastic foaming dispenser (reused one which used to contain hand wash, after washing it of course) and not a glass jar, is that alright or will i have to move the shampoo to a glass container?

    Looking forward to receiving your reply.

    Thanks,
    Prita

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    1. Hi Prita! I am guessing that the rosemary and oils are what made it turn brown. I wouldn't worry about it. As far as storage, I store mine in an old shampoo bottle now, so yes, a plastic dispenser will work just fine!

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  9. Hi Chanda

    My husbands scalp flakes after using a shampoo, is there a recipe you can recommend for such.
    Thank

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    Replies
    1. Tea tree oil, rosemary oil, apple cider vinegar, and lemon are all effective at treating dandruff.

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    2. I have a excellent remedy for you,,,,, 1 teaspoon Vodka,3 drops Rosemary,5 drops Lavender,,mix well and slow.
      Have him dip his fingers in mixture and massage well into scalp.
      It smells nice and can be put on hair anytime it is convenient for him, not necessarily before or after washing hair.
      Hope this help's! www.ryansnaturalhealing.com

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  10. Hi! I have tried the basic castile soap + water and rinsing with apple cider vinegar. Unfortunately, I am having a hard time washing it out of my hair, it leaves it greasy and my hair is super dry. I tried adding baking soda to the rinse and no change. Is my water too hard or is this common with castile soap?

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    Replies
    1. I have experienced this as well, and it always seems to help to reduce the castile soap and/or oil. Also, rinsing with apple cider vinegar should really help because it has a similar ph level to hair. If using baking soda, use that first with the shampoo and then rinse with apple cider vinegar. Hope this helps!

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  11. Hi, I wanted to be sure what 'T' stands for?
    Does the capital T mean teaspoon as well, or tablespoon?
    Can you please clarify?
    Thanks,
    Sabira

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    Replies
    1. Capital T is a tablespoon and lowercase t refers to a teaspoon!

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  12. Hi...
    For the Jojoba Oil, Grapeseed Oil and Avocado Oil...do we have to use all those oil or we just choose one of them?
    Which one is the best?

    Thanks

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    Replies
    1. Definitely just choose one. I prefer avocado, olive, or jojoba, but any of them will work. Sometimes I just use whatever oil I have in the cupboard!

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  13. Hey Chanda, by any chance do you have other recipes with castile soap to use around the house, like hand and/or dish soap, tanks

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  14. Hi, I just read through your post and may I say I am so interested in trying this! I have been washing my hair with a mixture of raw honey, water and essential oils for 3 weeks and it looks like I have a rat's nest on my head. I think adding castile soap was the missing ingredient. I heard that it is not a good idea to keep essential oils in plastic containers as they pull the toxins from the plastic or something, so I keep my shampoo in a wine bottle (lol) in my shower. The narrow spout makes pouring easier to control. I never even considered that the glass bottle would be dangerous, but that's probably because my roommate and I are in college so there are no kids around who might drop it. Thanks again for this wonderful post! I'm def making a batch today.

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    Replies
    1. Recycling a wine bottle... love it!

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  15. Hi, Thanks for the recipes. I tried the basic one and loved the results. But, please, what does "t", "T" and "ts" mean in recipes? Would you please spell these out so we know for sure what you mean? Thanks so much.

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    Replies
    1. Hi! So glad to hear you are enjoying the shampoos! In response to your question, capital T refers to a tablespoon and lowercase t is a teaspoon. Hope that helps!

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  16. Has anybody with afro hair tried this? what do you suggest?

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  17. What do you recommend for the castile soap if allergic to the coconut in it?

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  18. Hi there! I was wondering if these shampoo are also conditioner? Like, if i use them will my hair be soft and smooth?

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    1. The best conditioner is the apple cider vinegar rinse. It has a very similar ph level to hair, helping it to balance the hair and control frizz! I never wash my hair without rinsing with it!

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  19. Thank you very much for your article! I have been researching homemade shampoo recipes for a while now, and this is definitely the most helpful one I've found! I was wondering which recipe you would recommend for curly/dry hair?

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    1. Hi Adriana, I'm glad you found this post helpful! As for choosing a shampoo for curly/dry hair, any of these work well because they all contain beneficial oils that help add moisture to dry hair. Also, it is important not to wash your hair too often, not more than 2-3 times a week, less if you can stand it:) I highly recommend using apple cider vinegar as a rinse every time you shampoo, it really helps transform the hair!

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  20. Thanks for the article, I have wanted to try homemade shampoo for a while. I just have a question about the vinegar rinses for restoring pH balance to my hair. You have advised to use the apple cider vinegar rinse once weekly but should I be using a vinegar rinse every time after I shampoo, if so which one do you recommend? Thanks once again

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    1. I recommend using an apple cider vinegar rinse after every shampoo to restore the hair's natural ph level, add shine, and increase manageability. I am a huge proponent of shampooing no more than a few times a week, once a week is best if you can stand it!

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  21. Hi! I used the basic recipe from here but I added tea tree oil too, I used peppermint Dr. Bronners soap which I boiled down with water and some lemongrass. Then I added it to the glass container and added the jojoba oil and tea tree oil. The first time I used the mixture I used what was left over of the soap and water only and that seemed to leave a greasy residue in my hair. So the next time I used the entire mixture and it was a little better, but not much. I was wondering if there is anything else I could try?

    I tried a recipe before that was castile soap, coconut milk, jojoba, and coconut oil, that also left an awful residue in my hair and I now use it as a body wash (which works great). So then I came here, I'm just wondering if there is anything I can do to make it work for my hair? Thank you!

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    1. Hi Kate! It can be tricky at first to find a good ratio of soap-water-oil that works for your hair. I have experienced the greasy residue a few times too, and it is helpful to reduce the Castile soap and/or oil. Also, using baking soda with the shampoo helps to remove buildup and rinsing with apple cider vinegar restores the hair to it's natural ph level, enhancing shine and manageability. Hope this helps!

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  22. Hi Chanda, I've been researching and using homemade shampoos for a few months now and this is the best compilation of information I've found yet! I started by using a strong nettle tea and baking soda with a few drops of lavender essential oil. I've experimented with aloe and glycerin but haven't tried the castile soap yet. My white hair has started to yellow and I'm working on that (bought a shampoo with centaury flower) and am going to order bulk flowers to make into a strong tea. Will use that in the Hydrate recipe you posted above in place of the distilled water. Have you heard of anything else to brighten yellowing grey? Thanks for the great post!

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  23. Hi Sara! It sounds like you are already doing a lot of the right things, nettle and lavender are both effective at brightening the hair! Chamomile and rosemary are also known for their brightening and smoothing properties so give those a try as well.

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  24. Hi,

    Is distilled water just boiled water?
    Thanks, Rita

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    Replies
    1. your best bet would be to buy the distilled, when you boil, you end up with all the mineral buildup and the alkali too.
      it's cheap and you will be sure of getting a good clean soap

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  25. Hello, I have recently been expirementing with going all natural...and the last month I have been washing my hair only with a baking soda and water mixture. I have very long (down past my hips) but thin hair. The good thing about it is that my hair does not smell bad inbetween washes and doesn't get greasy. However, I have noticed that in the last week and half my hair (especially towards the ends) has been feeling very dry, gets tangled more easily, and I have been loosing a TON of hair. Like a handful after every time I wash it (which is usually 2-3 times a week), which is understandably of considerable concern to me. Do you have any suggestions for how I might be able to rectify those 3 problems? I would appreciate your advice. Thank you!

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  26. Hey. Would you recommend mixing baking soda with herb infused water? I do not really like castille soap.

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    1. Hi! Definitely! In fact, I have actually strayed away from using Castile soap in favor of no-poo, which is essentially baking soda for shampoo and apple cider vinegar as a rinse. Getting ready to write a post on it, just waiting for enough time to pass to show before and after pics :)

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  27. Thanks for sharing all this information. what can we add to this which can be helpful for hair loss

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    1. Rosemary and sage are both helpful to combat hair loss. I also recommend talking evening primrose oil and saw palmetto orally to promote hair growth!

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  28. I successfully used guar gum as a thickening agent to my homemade shampoo! 1 teaspoon guar gum for every cup of distilled water. Just a little heat and a whisk and it is soooooo easy to squeeze out of my recycled shampoo bottle!!!

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  29. I've researched a lot about homemade shampoos and you have compile an excellent list. Thank you for sharing.

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  30. I just made a similar shampoo to your basic recipe, but added guar gum, and used coconut oil. I used 1 tsp guar gum for each cup of shampoo, but it's very thick, I'd recommend 1/2 - 3/4 tsp per cup of liquid shampoo.

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  31. All the recipes sound wonderful, can't wait to try them! Quick question. I noticed one of them called for glycerin, is that still considered natural? Will it cause buildup? Thank you!

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    1. Yes, vegetable glycerin is completely natural. I've never had a problem with build-up, but I am vigilant about rinsing with apple cider vinegar, which is extremely helpful at removing build up!

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  32. Hi, wondering when you say to only shampoo 2-3x per week, are you still rinsing on the other days with just the ACV? Or do you not get your hair wet at all on the other days? My scalp feels icky and gets oily if I don't wash every 1-2 days, but then my hair seems to get dried out. I was thinking of using the corn starch as you had recommended on the other days, and still rinsing with ACV? Do you mix a teaspoon of cornstarch with a little water and rub onto scalp?

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  33. Hi there, great post! I have been doing a lot of research and this is so helpful because there are actually amounts of everything to add (many other sites just post the "ingredients"). I bought a castile soap bar, and I noticed that some of the recipes call for liquid and some of them are non specific. Is it alright to use the bar of castile soap? And I should be creating it first, correct?

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  34. I have a question about the Sage shampoo recipe. Does the recipe call for a specific type of sage or can any type be used?

    I have many types of Sage at my disposal, but the most common is Silver Sage, Artemisia Cana. I'm guessing the recipe calls for garden sage, but I'd like to know for sure.

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  35. I'm suffering from hair loss. Is it Ok to mix all these herbs together?

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  36. I'm suffering hair loss. Is it safe to use all these herb together?

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    Replies
    1. I wouldn't recommend mixing them all together, although it is perfectly safe. I would stick to rosemary and sage for the shampoo and start taking evening primrose oil and saw palmetto orally to help combat loss and promote growth!

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  37. Thanks for Posting ! first time I have found a genuine post related to Chemical Free Shampoo

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  38. I just made my own shampoo with castle soap, lemon grass, henna, and distilled water. It was so watery (as I was told it would be) that I wasn't certain I was getting all of my hair. Then when I got out of the shower my hair was filmy and greasy. I read that you can add witch hazel to the mix to cut the film... has anyone tried that?

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  39. All the info in here is wonderful! Can I add the apple cider vinegar to the shampoo mixture? Or is it best used as a rinse afterwards?

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    1. I'm glad you found it helpful! The vinegar is best as a rinse after shampooing! Restores hair to it's natural Ph and adds shine and manageability!

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  40. Hi Chanda... Such wonderful info you got, am looking forward to try them out. Though i have a question for you; after making the shampoo, for how long can it stay at room temperature before going bad?

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  41. congratulations guys, quality information you have given!!! bubblegumcasting.com

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  42. Word from Dr.Bronners website is no one with dyed hair should use castile soap. The pH, being on the higher end, opens the hair shaft and allows the dye to be stripped out. Anyone having this issue with dyed hair?

    Sabrina S.

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